The Bachelor of Science in Sociology requires a minimum of 120 credits, with at least 33 of those credits in sociology and other approved courses. The baccalaureate curriculum in sociology seeks to ensure that each student develops a solid foundation in the basic principles, theories and techniques of analysis in sociology. It also encourages students to pursue an interdisciplinary approach by incorporating course credit from closely related subject areas in other programs. Since students majoring in sociology vary in their interests and career goals, the curriculum allows for a great deal of flexibility in developing individual courses of study. Students who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in sociology usually will take more than the minimum number of upper-level courses. The program provides opportunities for involvement in faculty research through its course offerings, which include independent study, internships and honors research.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following:

  • Understand sociological theory
    Students will demonstrate an ability to apply different theoretical perspectives to social issues as well as compare and contrast basic theoretical orientations.
  • Understand sociological concepts
    Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts in sociology, such that students will be able to define, give examples and demonstrate the relevance of culture, social structure, institutions, socialization, stratification, social change and differentiations by race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age and class.
  • Understand sociological research and analysis
    Students will demonstrate knowledge of basic methodological approaches (both quantitative and qualitative) in sociology and the general role of methodology in building sociological knowledge. Students will know how to retrieve data sets from the Internet, read and produce descriptive statistics, and work with data analysis software, such as SPSS.
 

Degree requirements for Sociology, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

General education requirements

CourseTitleHours
University Core Education Curriculum (minimum 21 credits)
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry I [View Image]
Focused Inquiry I3
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry II [View Image]
Focused Inquiry II3
UNIV 200Inquiry and the Craft of Argument3
Approved humanities/fine arts3
Approved natural/physical sciences3-4
Approved quantitative literacy3-4
Approved social/behavioral sciences3-4
Total Hours21-24
CourseTitleHours
Additional College of Humanities and Sciences requirements (11-23 credits)
HUMS 202Choices in a Consumer Society1
Approved H&S diverse and global communities3
Approved H&S human, social and political behavior (fulfills University Core social/behavioral sciences)
Approved H&S literature and civilization (fulfills University Core humanities/fine arts)
Approved H&S science and technology (fulfills University Core natural/physical sciences)
Approved H&S general education electives6-8
Experiential fine arts 11-3
Foreign language through the 102 level (by course or placement)0-8
Total Hours11-23
1

Course offered by the School of the Arts

Collateral requirements

CourseTitleHours
STAT 210Basic Practice of Statistics 23

Major core requirements

CourseTitleHours
SOCY 101 Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Sociology [View Image]
Introduction to Sociology3
SOCY 202Foundations of Theory 23
SOCY 320Research Methods in the Social Sciences 23
SOCY 402Contemporary Theory 23
SOCY 406Sociology Senior Seminar 23
Total Hours15
2

A minimum grade of C is required in this course. 

Sociology electives

CourseTitleHours
300- to 400-level SOCY courses 318
Total Hours18
3

Students have an option of completing three elective credits chosen from any 300- or 400-level SOCS course.

Open electives

CourseTitleHours
Select 38-52 open elective credits38-52

The minimum total of credit hours required for this degree is 120.

What follows is a sample plan that meets the prescribed requirements within a four-year course of study at VCU. Please contact your adviser before beginning course work toward a degree.

Freshman year
Fall semesterHours
MATH 131Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics (satisfies approved quantitative literacy; if placed out of MATH 131, choose any approved H&S elective)3
UNIV 101Introduction to the University1
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry I [View Image]
Focused Inquiry I3
Approved H&S diverse and global communities3
Approved H&S general education elective3
 Term Hours: 13
Spring semester
HUMS 202Choices in a Consumer Society1
SOCY 101 Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Sociology [View Image]
Introduction to Sociology3
STAT 210Basic Practice of Statistics (if placed out or have already taken STAT 210, choose any approved H&S elective)3
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry II [View Image]
Focused Inquiry II3
Approved H&S general education elective3
Open elective3
 Term Hours: 16
Sophomore year
Fall semester
SOCY 202Foundations of Theory3
UNIV 200Inquiry and the Craft of Argument3
Approved H&S literature and civilization course3
Foreign language (101-level)4
Open elective3
 Term Hours: 16
Spring semester
SOCY 320Research Methods in the Social Sciences3
300-level SOCY elective3
Approved H&S experiential fine arts1-3
Approved H&S science and technology3-4
Foreign language (102 level)4
 Term Hours: 14-17
Junior year
Fall semester
300-level SOCY elective3
300- to 400-level SOCY electives (except SOCY 402 or SOCY 406)6
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)7
 Term Hours: 16
Spring semester
300- to 400-level SOCY electives or approved SOCY or SOCS electives6
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)9
 Term Hours: 15
Senior year
Fall semester
SOCY 402Contemporary Theory3
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)12
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
SOCY 406Sociology Senior Seminar3
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)12
 Term Hours: 15
 Total Hours: 120-123

The minimum total of credit hours required for this degree is 120.

Accelerated B.S. and M.S.

The accelerated B.S. and M.S. program allows qualified students to earn both the B.S. and M.S. in Sociology in a minimum of five years by completing approved graduate courses during the senior year of their undergraduate program. Students in the program may count up to 12 hours of graduate courses toward both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. Thus, the two degrees may be earned with a minimum of 144 credits rather than the 156 credits necessary if the two degrees are pursued separately.

Students holding these degrees will have the strong analytical and methodological skills that prepare them for future academic and/or professional work. Using both theory and methods, students will develop a sociological imagination central to the critical analysis of modern social problems. The program will also provide students with opportunities to participate in research projects, internships and other training programs where they develop the skills to evaluate, refine and apply what they learn in the classroom.

Admission to the program

Minimum qualifications for admittance to the program include completion of 90 undergraduate credit hours including a minimum of nine credit hours in sociology courses; an overall GPA of 3.0; and a GPA of 3.3 in sociology course work. Successful applicants would enter the program in the fall semester of their senior year. (Optional: Students who do not meet the minimum GPA requirements may submit GRE scores to receive further consideration.)  Prior to being formally considered for admission and before enrolling in graduate courses, the student must complete the graduate school application, submit GRE general aptitude scores and supply supporting information required for admission.

Undergraduate students must have departmental approval to participate in an accelerated program and must apply for admission to the master's program prior to beginning their final year of full-time undergraduate study. Candidates should submit applications for admission immediately following the spring of their junior year, but no later than the M.S. program admission deadline. The entry term for the master's program will be the next available admission term following the last semester of undergraduate study. Admission to the master’s program is provisional until the undergraduate degree has been conferred. Upon completion and conferral of the undergraduate degree, students are fully admitted to the master’s program.

Three reference letters (at least one from a sociology faculty member) must accompany the application. The director of graduate studies for the sociology master’s program will provide guidance of students in this program. Students who are interested in this program should consult with the director of graduate studies or the director of undergraduate studies before they have completed 90 credits. Both directors may be contacted for more information about admission procedures.

Once admitted into the accelerated program, students must meet the standards of performance applicable to graduate students as described in the “Satisfactory academic progress” section of the Graduate Bulletin, including maintaining a 3.0 GPA. Guidance to students admitted to the accelerated program is provided by both the undergraduate sociology adviser and the faculty adviser to the graduate program.

Degree requirements

The Bachelor of Science in Sociology degree will be awarded upon completion of a minimum of 120 credits and the satisfactory completion of all undergraduate degree requirements as stated in the Undergraduate Bulletin.

A maximum of 12 graduate credits may be taken prior to completion of the baccalaureate degree. These graduate credits may be used to satisfy required major electives or open elective credits for the undergraduate degree. These courses are shared credits with the graduate program, meaning that they will be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements.

The graduate sociology courses that may be taken as an undergraduate, once a student is admitted to the program, are:

CourseTitleHours
SOCY 502Contemporary Sociological Theory3
SOCY/STAT 508Introduction to Social Statistics3
SOCY 601Sociological Research Methods3
SOCY/STAT 608Statistics for Social Research3
Other SOCY graduate courses, with the approval of the director of graduate studies, may serve as an elective requirement for the M.S. degree and an elective for the undergraduate major
Total Hours12

Recommended course sequence/plan of study

What follows is the recommended plan of study for students interested in the accelerated program beginning in the fall of the junior year prior to admission to the accelerated program in the senior year.

CourseTitleHours
Junior year
Fall semester
300-level SOCY elective3
300- to 400-level SOCY electives (except SOCY 402 or SOCY 406)6
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)7
Term Hours: 16
Spring semester
300- to 400-level SOCY electives or approved SOCY or SOCS electives6
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)9
Term Hours:15
Senior year
Fall semester
SOCY 502Contemporary Sociological Theory (may count for both undergraduate and graduate credits in accelerated program)3
SOCY/STAT 508Introduction to Social Statistics (may count for both undergraduate and graduate credits in accelerated program)3
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)9
Term Hours:15
Spring semester
SOCY 406Sociology Senior Seminar3
SOCY 601Sociological Research Methods (may count for both undergraduate and graduate credits in accelerated program)3
SOCY/STAT 608Statistics for Social Research (may count for both undergraduate and graduate credits in accelerated program)3
Open electives (upper-level preferred, may take additional SOCY electives)6
Term Hours:15
Fifth year
Fall semester
SOCY 602Applications of Sociological Research Methods3
SOCY 699Seminar in Sociological Practice3
500- to 600-level SOCY electives6
Term Hours:12
Spring semester
SOCY 699Seminar in Sociological Practice3
500- to 600-level SOCY electives6
Term Hours:12

SOCY 101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Sociology [View Image]

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to the study of human society. The basic concepts of society and culture and their relationships to each other are studied and then used to analyze the major social institutions.

SOCY 104. Sociology of Racism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course will explore the direct and indirect ways in which racial attitudes are acquired, their effect on individuals and society, and the institutional and ideological manifestations of racism as a "faith system," as exploitation and as a form of human conflict. The central focus of interest will be on black-white relationships. Crosslisted as: AFAM 104.

SOCY 202. Foundations of Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An introduction to classical theoretical traditions that have guided sociological work. Classical theorists whose writings have shaped the discipline will be studied, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, W.E.B. Du Bois and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. This course also traces the historical development of the discipline of sociology during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

SOCY 302. Contemporary Social Problems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. The examination from a sociological perspective of contemporary social problems such as population growth, crime, racism, family problems, substance abuse and aging in terms of their impact on American social institutions and values.

SOCY 303. Sociology of Deviance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An analysis of the relationship between social structure, social control and patterns of social deviance; a survey and critique of present social theories in light of empirical research and application of the theories to selected problem areas.

SOCY 304. Sociology of Families. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101 or ANTH 103/INTL 103. The family in its social and cultural context. Analysis of child rearing, marriage, kinship, family crises and family change in various societies around the world. Crosslisted as: ANTH 304/GSWS 304.

SOCY 305. African American Family in Social Context. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. A socio-historical examination of the development of the family system of Americans from Africa. Focuses on large-scale (macro level) processes such as changes in the major mode of economic production and in political systems and the corresponding changes in black family structure and functioning. Presents the theoretical material on African-American families and social change that prepares students for further study of the family as a social institution and for the study of family policy. This course is designed to meet the needs of upper-division social science majors. Crosslisted as: AFAM 305/GSWS 305.

SOCY 307. Sociology of Food. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Examines the role food plays in shaping cultures, societies and social inequalities by examining the modern food system, social inequalities surrounding food access and alternatives to the current system.

SOCY 310. Social Movements and Social Conflict. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Theory and practice of social movements, community organizing and other forms of collective behavior.

SOCY 315. Sociology of Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Analysis of education as a social institution in the societal context. Cross-cultural comparative perspectives on education.

SOCY 320. Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY 101; and STAT 210 with a minimum grade of C. Current methods of research in the social sciences. Includes a brief introduction to the use of SPSS for storage, retrieval and exploration of social science data.

SOCY 321. Sociology of Economic Inequalities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Analysis of social mobility, class, status and power.

SOCY 322. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. A study of the various racial, religious and ethnic minority groups. Issues of power, pluralism and assimilation are addressed as well as the relationship between subcultures and the dominant culture.

SOCY 325. Analysis of Sociological Data. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: POLI/SOCY 320 and STAT 210. Statistical techniques used in the analysis of data from sample surveys and censuses, including tabular, graphical and inferential procedures. SPSS software will be used in the laboratory.

SOCY 326. Rural Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An introduction to rural society, culture, social interactions and systemic change. The rural regions of the United States will be covered, but emphasis will be given to Appalachia, rural Virginia and the South.

SOCY 327. Urban Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Origin, character and significance of urban communities. Ecological and social factors are analyzed as well as changes in urban social organization and their consequences.

SOCY 330. Global Societies: Trends and Issues. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INTL/POLI 105 or POLI 201 or SOCY 101. An analysis of factors that are promoting the globalization of social, economic and political relations, and an inquiry into implications of these developments for individuals, localities, nations and the world community. The course will highlight the impact of culture and ethnicity, historical and emerging patterns of international business activity and their societal significance, divergent strategies for economic and social development in the world's regions, and the effects of population growth and environmental problems on public life within and among nations. Crosslisted as: INTL 330.

SOCY 331. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Analysis of the biological, cultural, psychological and social factors involved in juvenile delinquency and their relation to current techniques of treatment, prevention and control.

SOCY 332. Immigration and American Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An examination of the social and political dynamics surrounding U.S. immigration. Possible topics include examination of why people migrate, historical changes in U.S. immigration, policies that let some people in and keep others out, and consideration of the lives of immigrants once they have settled in the country.

SOCY 333. Gender in Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101 or permission of instructor. Explores different theoretical approaches to gender and its intersections with other sources of inequality, including sexuality, race, class and age. Possible topics include masculinities, gender and the body, and how gender operates in various institutional settings, such as the economy and the family. Crosslisted as: GSWS 333.

SOCY 334. Sociology of Women. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101 or consent of instructor. This course will examine the position and status of women across societies and the social forces that maintain existing patterns and arrangements. The integration of family and work in women's lives will be emphasized. Crosslisted as: GSWS 334.

SOCY 335. Sociology of Masculinities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Examines the sociological theories and empirical studies of men and masculinities. Topics include the relational thinking of gender inequality, hegemonic masculinity, subordinated masculinities, inclusive masculinity, hybrid masculinity, toxic masculinity, female masculinity and male femininity, and intersectional masculinities. Addresses the effects and mechanisms of masculinities in social settings, such as the workplace, family, marriage, intimacy, pop culture, politics, migration, globalization and social movements, through empirical studies.

SOCY 336. Violence Against Women. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101 or GSWS 201. An examination of violence against women from a global and local perspective with a primary focus on violence perpetrated against women in the U.S. Requires a minimum of 20 hours of community service. Crosslisted as: GSWS 336.

SOCY 340. Self and Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An exploration of sociological theories of everyday life, including examination of the socialization process, as well as how thoughts, feelings and behaviors are guided by micro-level social forces that often remain just outside of awareness. Particular attention will be given to those qualities that make individuals uniquely human -- including self-awareness, identity, emotions, empathy, language and symbols.

SOCY 341. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Social and psychological principles and research related to the individual in groups. Specific topics include motivation for individuals forming and joining groups, performance and productivity of group members, group leadership and majority and minority influence. The group will be examined in relation to the larger society and as a subculture in itself. Crosslisted as: PSYC 341.

SOCY 344. Medical Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. A survey of the social, economic, cultural and social psychological factors in health and illness; the sociology of health and medical care organizations and settings; the sociology of health occupations; and the techniques of research in medical sociology.

SOCY 350. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. An overview of the field of environmental sociology, with a specific focus on the ways in which climate change affects, and is affected by, modern society. Possible topics include environmental racism, indigenous rights and activism, cultures of waste and disposability, capitalism and ecological transformation, corporate greenwashing, global food-systems, and climate refugees.

SOCY 360. Sociology of Religion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. A systematic review and assessment of major sociological theories of and empirical research on religious behavior and groups. Topics include the structure of religious organizations; social correlates and functions of religion; denominationalism; religion and social class, social change and population. Crosslisted as: RELS 360.

SOCY 370. Media and Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101, MASC 101 or POLI 103. A survey of the organization and social impact of the major types of mass media. Potential topics include the media as socializing agents; the effect of media messages on cultural patterns and social values; the impact of technology on social behavior; the role of "audiences" in interpreting media content; political and economic influences on the media industry; and the media as an instrument of social change. The structure and functions of the media in different societies will be compared.

SOCY 380. Public Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Examines what it means to "do sociology" in public and what it means to make sociological work accessible and to involve multiple publics. Particular attention is paid to conceptualizing the term public sociology; public sociology in practice, including on college campuses; and critical digital literacy.

SOCY 391. Topics in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. Maximum 6 credits per semester; maximum total of 18 credits in all departmental topics courses that may be applied to the major. Check with department for specific prerequisites. A discussion of specialized areas of sociological interest. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

SOCY 401. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of the instructor. Explores issues surrounding the disparities in morbidity and mortality experienced by racial/ethnic minority groups, including the impact of structural racism, socioeconomic status, legal status, neighborhood conditions and access to health care. Also examines potential strategies for working toward health equity. Students are required to participate in an experiential exercise designed to enhance learning.

SOCY 402. Contemporary Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 with a minimum grade of C; pre- or corequisite: SOCY 320. Restricted to sociology majors. A study of the works of the major sociological theorists of the 20th century.

SOCY 403. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of instructor. Analysis of the nature, extent and distribution of crime, emphasizing theories of and research on causation, prediction and prevention.

SOCY 406. Sociology Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY 202 and SOCY 320, both with a minimum grade of C; and at least 21 credit hours in sociology. Course must be taken in the student's last 30 hours at VCU. Pre- or corequisite: SOCY 402. Senior capstone class; provides students the opportunity to synthesize, integrate and apply their sociological knowledge and skills.

SOCY 410. Aging and the Life Course. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the study of aging and the life course. Focus will be on research specific to older adulthood in order to foster an understanding of aging and old age as a characteristic of both individuals and societies. Requires a minimum of 20 hours of community service if taken as a service-learning course.

SOCY 420. Environmental Racism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. Examines the sociological study of environmental racism and the rise of the environmental justice paradigm through the scholarly lenses of environmental sociology, political sociology, critical race theory and environmental justice studies. Key environmental histories, social theories and case studies of environmental racism as well as the broader problem of environmental inequality will be explored.

SOCY 421. Advanced Research. 1-6 Hours.

Methods Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisites: POLI 320/SOCY 320 and SOCY 325. A laboratory course providing training in the application of social research methods under laboratory and field situations to problems of mutual interest to community policy makers and professionals in the disciplines of sociology, social psychology and anthropology. This course is designed to enhance the skills of students in applied social research. With direct supervision by the instructor, individuals or small groups of students will address themselves to the tasks of defining, designing and executing research projects.

SOCY 425. Digital Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. An exploration of the sociological foundations of digital technologies including apps, platforms and social media. Focus will be on the ways in which people's use of digital technologies configures their sense of self and their embodiment of social relations, as well as the role of digital media in the creation or reproduction of social institutions and structures.

SOCY 426. Population Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of instructor. The study of trends in fertility, mortality, population growth, distribution, migration and composition. The mutual influences of these factors and social organization.

SOCY 430. Politics, Power and Ideology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of instructor. Sociological analysis of political organization and behavior. Such subjects as distribution and uses of power, creation and management of group conflict, development and diffusion of political ideologies, and problems of bureaucracy and mass society will be considered.

SOCY 434. Sociology of Sport. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. Sport will be viewed as a major social institution within many societies. The class will study the relationship between sport and society -- both in terms of sport reflecting the ideology and culture of society and sport as an active agent of change in society. Race, gender and social class will be examined within the context of sport.

SOCY 435. Sociology of Consumption. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. Examination and analysis of consumption in modern society, including food, fashion, advertising and opportunities for consumer activism in a globalized world.

SOCY 436. Sociology of Work and Labor Markets. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202 or permission of instructor. The study of industrial plants and business organizations as social systems.

SOCY 440. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY 202 and SOCY 340 or permission of instructor. The study of how human groups create the environment that, in turn, influences their individual behavior. The symbolic interactionist perspective will be thoroughly explored for its contribution to the study of persons, objects and meaning.

SOCY 441. Sociology of Emotions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. Exploration of the sociological forces that shape the way we define our emotions, how we communicate through emotions -- both explicitly and implicitly -- and how our emotions are guided by sociocultural norms. Attention will also be paid to the regulation of human emotions in terms of culture, gender, occupation and interpersonal relationships.

SOCY 446. Sociology of Mental Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. A survey of selected social, economic, cultural and social psychological factors in mental health and illness. Such problems as defining mental illness; social factors in the distribution, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of mental disorders; mental illness as a social role; and research methods used in the sociology of mental illness will be considered.

SOCY 450. Understanding Capitalism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. A critical appraisal of modern capitalist society. Classical and contemporary sociological theory, focusing on comparative-historical methodologies, including historical materialism and critical political economy.

SOCY 476. Economic Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. An examination of labor force participation in terms of the individual worker's experience, the work setting, the nature of occupations and labor force composition.

SOCY 491. Topics in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 202. Maximum 6 credits per semester; maximum total of 18 credits in all departmental topics courses that may be applied to the major. Check with department for specific prerequisites. A discussion of specialized areas of sociological interest. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

SOCY 492. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 6 credits per semester; maximum total of 12 credits for all independent study courses. Open generally only to students of junior or senior standing who have acquired at least 12 credits in the departmental discipline. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and department chair must be received prior to registration of the course. Cannot be used in place of existing courses.

SOCY 493. Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 field experience hours. 1-3 credits (50 hours per credit). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY 101 and SOCY 202. Enrollment is restricted to sociology majors of junior or senior standing. Applications must be approved by the internship coordinator. Provides an opportunity to apply and expand sociological knowledge through actual experience in a variety of work settings. Graded as pass/fail.

SOCY 498. Honors Research Course. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: student must be in the honors program of the department and have achieved senior status. This course will entail the planning and execution of a major research project demonstrating a thorough understanding and use of research techniques in sociological/anthropological analysis, knowledge of relevant literature, sophisticated writing and research ability under the direction of a faculty mentor.