Browse Items (72 total)

Group portrait of attendees at the Interracial Conference of Church Women, Eagles Mere, Pa., September 21-22, 1926. The conference was held by the Commission on the Church and Race Relations of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in…

Studio portrait of costumed figures before a sign saying "We Fight For Democracy." This photograph was taken during World War I.  Ralph Harvie Wormley as Uncle Sam; Adeline Harmon Cowles as Columbia, Martha Jobson, as Democracy holding a ballot…

Equal Suffrage League of Richmond, Va. in front of Washington Monument, Capitol Square, Richmond. The members of the ESL were promoting the suffrage film, "Your Girl and Mine." Photo published in The Times-Dispatch: Richmond, Va., February 28,…

Photograph of students from Luther Judson Price High School of Atlanta, Ga., prepare to register to vote. Caption attached to photograph: "18 year old high school students of Atlanta, Georgia as they embark by bus to register in the 1959 Voter…

Lorena Weeks had worked as a Southern Bell telephone operator for many years when she was denied a higher paying position as a company switchman on the basis that the job was only open to men, citing a Georgia state rule that women employees could…

In 1981, Dr. Michael Gottlieb of UCLA identified a new disease that, among its many signs, severely weakened the immune system. Named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), this disease was initially seen among gay men in large cities.  Human…

French bacteriologists Albert Calmette (1863–1933) and Camille Guérin (1872–1961) finalized the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine for tuberculosis in 1921. The vaccine remains the only tuberculosis vaccine in use today. While not perfect,…

In the early-20th century, Europe and the U.S. saw the rise of “open air” schools intended to create healthy environments to combat tuberculosis using the principles of sanatoria. Sometimes purpose-built, and sometimes converted spaces, open air…

Students from the old Cary Street School (Madison School) in Richmond, Va., demonstrate handwashing before having lunch. Washing hands regularly with soap and water remains one of the most important steps in preventing the spread of many…

Lantern slide. Image taken in Richmond, Va in 1907. The Richmond Health Department formed in 1906. One of its early initiatives (1907) was to investigate 433 cases of typhoid fever, creating the city’s first systematic study of infectious disease.…

This parade float from Richmond’s Adventure Days (1929) served as a public health reminder of cholera, noting “Richmonders Died at the Average Age of 24 in 1872.”

After the influenza virus was finally identified in 1933, researchers immediately started to develop a vaccine. The first flu vaccine was approved for U.S. military use in 1945 and for civilian use in 1946. Unfortunately, the flu has several types,…

Black and white photograph showing a Ku Klux Klan rally held near Darbytown Road in eastern Henrico County, Va. The rally, sponsored by the United Klans of America - Realm of Virginia, was held on July 4, 1967. The photograph shows a line of white…

Black and white photograph showing a man wearing a military-style Ku Klux Klan outfit with Klan symbol on sleeve. The man was participating in a parade on Broad Street in Richmond, Va., in support of the Klan and possibly to drum up attendance at an…

Black and white photograph of a man and a woman in a car during an anti-busing motorcade to Washington, D.C. The car is driving past the U.S. Supreme Court building and has a poster taped to the driver's side door of the car. The poster is of "The…

Black and white photograph of a Richmond-based anti-busing motorcade passing through Washington, D.C. on 2nd Street behind the U.S. Supreme Court building. A policeman walks beside two cars.On February 17, 1972, nearly 3,300 cars traveled in a…

Black and white photograph of people preparing for an anti-busing demonstration. A woman stands holding an American flag, and a man standing with her wears a hand-lettered anti-busing sign, "Forced bussing & consolidation of schools will lead to…

Students sing outside Beulah AME Church Parsonage, Farmville, Va., August 1963, in protest of the closing of Prince Edward County Schools. Woman singing at left is Ernestine Land. Tony Reid stands at right.

Wearing white robes and hoods, members of the Ku Klux Klan, a right-wing extremist organization, parade on Grace Street in Richmond circa 1925. This photograph was taken at the intersection of Grace and Fifth streets, just a few blocks from the…

Lucy Goode Brooks (1818–1900) and members of the Ladies Sewing Circle for Charitable Work established the Friends Asylum for Colored Orphans in 1871. These formerly enslaved women enlisted the support of the Cedar Creek Meeting Society of Friends…

Passaic strikers men, women, and children take a break from the cold to get a beverage. This event took place during the Passaic Textile Strike, 1926.Dated March 4, 1926.

Children of Forstmann Huffman employees participate in strike. They hold signs reading "WE WANT MORE FOOD AND MORE CLOTHES" and "WE ARE STRIKERS CHILDREN WE NEED MORE FOOD" Image dated March 8, 1926.

Martin Winkler of Garfield, New Jersey is arrested for resistance, after which he received a 10 day prison sentence.This event took place during the Passaic Textile Strike, 1926.

In 1894, Mary Tinsley Greenhow, who as a teenager was paralyzed during a horse riding accident, founded the Virginia Home for Incurables. Disabled Richmonders needing life-long care lived at the home near Capitol Square. In 1898, the home moved to W.…

The Memorial Foundation for Children’s story began in 1805, when a homeless girl supposedly presented herself at the door of Jean Moncure Wood, wife of Governor James E. Wood. Realizing that the city lacked a shelter for needy girls, Mrs. Wood…
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