Document Type

Article

Original Publication Date

2017

Journal/Book/Conference Title

ARCHIVES OF PATHOLOGY & LABORATORY MEDICINE

Volume

141

Issue

6

First Page

798

Last Page

805

DOI of Original Publication

10.5858/arpa.2016-0622-RA

Comments

Originally published at http://doi.org/10.5858/arpa.2016-0622-RA

Date of Submission

July 2017

Abstract

Context.-With the decrease in the cost of sequencing, the clinical testing paradigm has shifted from single gene to gene panel and now whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. Clinical laboratories are rapidly implementing next-generation sequencing-based whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. Because a large number of targets are covered by whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, it is critical that a laboratory perform appropriate validation studies, develop a quality assurance and quality control program, and participate in proficiency testing.

Objective.-To provide recommendations for wholeexome and whole-genome sequencing assay design, validation, and implementation for the detection of germline variants associated in inherited disorders.

Data Sources.-An example of trio sequencing, filtration and annotation of variants, and phenotypic consideration to arrive at clinical diagnosis is discussed.

Conclusions.-It is critical that clinical laboratories planning to implement whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing design and validate the assay to specifications and ensure adequate performance prior to implementation. Test design specifications, including variant filtering and annotation, phenotypic consideration, guidance on consenting options, and reporting of incidental findings, are provided. These are important steps a laboratory must take to validate and implement whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in a clinical setting for germline variants in inherited disorders.

Rights

Copyright © 2017 College of American Pathologists

Is Part Of

VCU Pathology Publications

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