Document Type

Article

Original Publication Date

1978

Journal/Book/Conference Title

The New England Journal of Medicine

Volume

298

Issue

5

First Page

243

Last Page

248

DOI of Original Publication

10.1056/NEJM197802022980504

Comments

Originally published at http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM197802022980504

Date of Submission

January 2015

Abstract

Abstract

Industrial workers exposed to the organochlorine pesticide, chlordecone (Kepone), had signs of toxicity in several organs. The extent of toxicity was proportional to the levels of this chemical in the tissues. In 22 patients, chlordecone was eliminated slowly from blood (half time of 165±27 days — mean ± S.E.M.) and fat (half time of 125 days, with a range of 97 to 177), chiefly in the stool. Output of chlordecone in bile was 10 to 20 times greater than in stool, suggesting that chlordecone is reabsorbed in the intestine. Cholestyramine, an anion-exchange resin that binds chlordecone, increased its fecal excretion by seven times. In a five-month trial, cholestyramine significantly accelerated elimination of chlordecone from blood, with a half life of 80±4 days (S.E.M.) (P

Rights

From The New England Journal of Medicine, Cohn, W.J., Boylan, J.J., Blanke, R.V., et al., Treatment of Chlordecone (Kepone) Toxicity with Cholestyramine — Results of a Controlled Clinical Trial, Vol. 298, Page 243, Copyright © 1978 Massachusetts Medical Society. Reprinted with permission.

Is Part Of

VCU Pathology Publications

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