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Neighborhood House, Richmond VA

Neighborhood House By Catherine A. Paul In the early 1900’s non-resident settlement houses were created throughout the country as the primary instrument of immigrant adjustment to America. In 1912, the Richmond Section of the National Council of Jewish Women established Neighborhood House at 19th and Broad in Richmond, Virginia to respond to the needs of… Continue Reading »

Americanization – selected publications

Americanization; Principles of Americanism, Essentials of Americanization, Technic of Race-Assimilation. Winthrop Talbot, Julia E. Johnsen, eds. New York: H.W.Wilson, 1920.   Immigration and Americanization: Selected Readings. Philip Davis, Bertha Schwartz, eds. Boston: Ginn and Company, 1920. Includes essays by Jane Addams, Lillian Wald, Henry Cabot Lodge, Prescott F. Hall, Kate Waller Barrett, Paul Kellogg, and… Continue Reading »

Theological Foundations of Charity: Catholic Social Teaching, The Social Gospel, and Tikkun Olam

A look at theological principles that have motivated Catholics, Protestants, and Jews to charitable acts. Continue Reading »

Healy, Bishop James Augustine (1830-1900)

James Augustine Healy: The First African American To Be Ordained a Roman Catholic PriestContinue Reading »

Church of All Nations, New York City

“A Long History of Community Service at the Church of All Nations,” by Cristina Vignone. “…the Church of All Nations ‘was always a community-oriented building…[cutting] across ethnic boundaries.'”Continue Reading »

Roosevelt, Eleanor and the AFSC

Written by Jack Sutters, former AFSC archivist. “Eleanor Roosevelt’s association with the AFSC began before Franklin Roosevelt’s inauguration in March 1933.”Continue Reading »

American Friends Service Committee

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that promotes lasting peace with justice, as a practical expression of faith in action. Drawing on continuing spiritual insights and working with people of many backgrounds, we nurture the seeds of change and respect for human life that transform social relations and systems.Continue Reading »

Twilight, Alexander (1795 – 1857)

For the next twelve years he learned reading, writing and math skills while performing various farming duties. He was able to save enough (probably with some assistance from the farmer for whom he labored) to enroll in Randolph’s Orange County Grammar School in 1815 at the age of 20. During the next six years (1815-1821) he completed not only the secondary school courses but also the first two years of a college level curriculum. Following his graduation from Randolph he was accepted at Middlebury College, entering as a junior in August of 1821. Two years later he received his bachelor’s degree. Middlebury College claims him to be the first African-American to earn a baccalaureate degree from an American college or university.Continue Reading »

Harmony Society: A Utopian Community

The Harmony Society, also called the Rappites, were similar to the Shakers in certain beliefs. Named after their founder, Johann Georg Rapp, the Rappites immigrated from Württemburg, Germany, to the United States in 1803, seeking religious freedom. Establishing a colony in Butler County, Pennsylvania, called Harmony, the Rappites held that the Bible was humanity’s sole authority.Continue Reading »

Amana Colonies: A Utopian Community

“The Amana Colonies were one of many utopian colonies established on American soil during the 18th and 19th centuries. There were hundreds of communal utopian experiments in the early United States, and the Shakers alone founded around 20 settlements. While great differences existed between the various utopian communities or colonies, each society shared a common bond in a vision of communal living in a utopian society.”Continue Reading »

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