Interior Design, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/interior-design/interior-design-bfa/

The Department of Interior Design, accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, provides the breadth of a university education with the depth of a professional curriculum. The curriculum provides for the study of space, form, color and light in collaboration with the pragmatic investigation of building codes, materials, finishes, construction methods and business practices. An important focus also is placed on the study of design theory and the history of interior environments. All of these areas are synthesized in the curriculum to provide learning of the overall context of the built interior environment. Graduates are prepared with the skills and knowledge that can facilitate the student’s transition into an entry-level interior design position at a successful firm or corporation, or entry into programs of advanced study. The department also prepares students with the skills and knowledge that will allow for lifelong learning and professional development in the design industry. Prospective students are encouraged to review the School of the Arts undergraduate admissions website as well as the Art Foundation Program website. Student learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following. Students will demonstrate professional values. The students will demonstrate professional values that address client and user needs in response to the built environment, professional ethics, environmental ethics and the role of sustainability in the practice of interior design. Students will demonstrate an understanding of a global perspective approach to thinking and problem-solving (viewing design with awareness and respect for cultural and social differences of people; understanding issues that affect the sustainability of the planet; understanding of the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world market). Students will demonstrate critical and analytical thinking, creative thinking, and the ability to think visually and volumetrically. Students will demonstrate professional discipline (i.e., time management, organizational skills) and active listening skills. Students will understand the importance of community, public service and engagement. Student work will demonstrate design fundamentals. Students will demonstrate knowledge of design fundamentals including design elements and principles, color principles, theories and systems, theories of design and composition, and principles and theories of lighting design. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the theories of human behavior in the built environment including human factors (ergonomics, anthropometrics), the relationship between human behavior and the built environment, and an understanding of the principles of sustainability. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the history of art, architecture and design. Students will demonstrate knowledge on public safety issues and awareness of code regulations as they relate to planning interior spaces. Student work will demonstrate knowledge of interior design. Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of the following: design process; design elements and principles; programming skills; competent schematic design and conceptual development; design development skills; skills in preparing drawings, schedules and specifications; understanding of how design solutions are impacted by codes, building systems and interior furnishing materials; and understanding of the impact of laws, codes, regulations, standards and practices that protect the health, safety and welfare of the public.    Student work will demonstrate effective communication. Students must express ideas clearly in a variety of methods. Completed design work will be presented verbally and through a series of drawings, models and other physical or digital media. Growth of presentation methods will be evident as students progress in their course work. Standards of interior design Students who have successfully completed the Art Foundation Program may enter the program in the fall semester only. All applicants must submit a portfolio of work. The department uses the portfolio evaluation criteria established in the School of the Arts for initial acceptance. A second portfolio review of interior design studio work takes place at the end of the sophomore year. The faculty uses the portfolio as an advising tool to determine student placement in the program. The student’s GPA also is evaluated to determine if the student may continue in the program. The following courses must be completed at the end of the sophomore year to be eligible for continuation in the program: Students who wish to transfer into the interior design program must first apply to the Art Foundation Program for evaluation. A student must demonstrate equivalent preparation at other institutions and submit a portfolio of work for review by interior design faculty. Transfer students admitted into the program must complete all major requirements determined to be missing from their academic design experience. Students must complete the required pre- and corequisites of the program in the order presented in the curriculum outline. This structure enables students to develop knowledge and skill bases in interior design that will prepare them for upper-level interior design studio courses ( IDES 301 , IDES 302 , IDES 400 and IDES 401 ) and successful entry into the interior design profession. Students must earn a minimum 2.5 GPA on all work before entering the program, in the semester immediately before entering the major and each semester they continue in the program. Students must maintain a minimum grade of C in each studio in order to continue to the next semester of studio courses. Students are required to have a laptop computer and appropriate software upon entry into the interior design program. The department recommends a specific computer package that is used throughout the academic year. The package is updated each year because of changes in computer technology. The total cost is approximately $3,800 and financial aid is available to those who qualify. An interior design student kit also is required upon initial entry into the program; it contains a variety of drawing supplies for graphics and interior design studios. Students will receive the computer requirements and student kit requirements upon acceptance into the program. Students with experience in interior design or related fields may challenge some interior design courses based on regulations for “ Undergraduate credit by examination ” as stated in this bulletin. Students must be accepted into the interior design program and challenges are based upon demonstrated experience, portfolio work and professional years of experience. No more than nine credit hours may be challenged and the challenge may not be requested during the final semester before graduation. Courses that may be challenged include: A student majoring in interior design who does not enroll in courses in the major as a full-time student for three or more consecutive semesters (including summer) must reapply to the program, submitting a portfolio and undergoing a grade review.

Philosophy, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in ethics and public policy

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/philosophy/philosophy-ba-concentration-ethics-public-policy/

The Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy requires a minimum of 120 credits, with at least 30 of those credits in philosophy. Fifteen of these credits must be selected from upper-level philosophy courses. Students whose main interests in philosophy are ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of law or public policy (and who may wish to pursue graduate work in law, political science, economics and related areas) will probably want to choose the ethics and public policy concentration. Student learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Demonstrate a good knowledge of and facility with the methods and concepts of modern, analytic philosophy Demonstrate a good knowledge of the current state of academic discussion of some of the central philosophical topics Demonstrate some knowledge of the history of philosophy, including both major themes and movements and some specific figures and systems Demonstrate the ability to think critically and systemically about philosophical problems, both abstract and practical, and to write clearly and cogently about them Demonstrate the ability to construct and analyze arguments clearly and cogently, independently of their subject matter.

International Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in general studies

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/school-worldstudies/international-studies-ba-concentration-general-studies/

The international studies program offers a varied interdisciplinary humanities curriculum, global in scope and designed to increase students’ knowledge about the cultures and traditions, languages, literature and media, history, values, concerns, and aspirations of peoples in different countries and regions of the world. The goal of the program is ultimately also to both broaden students’ comparative intercultural perspectives and develop their cross-cultural communication abilities. Within each chosen concentration, the interdisciplinary range of offerings allows for flexibility in configuring each individual’s course of study, which can be organized in a manner that best suits a student’s particular needs.

Dance and Choreography, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in performance/Richmond Ballet

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/dance-choreography/dance-choreography-bfa-performance-concentration-richmond-ballet/

VCU’s Department of Dance and Choreography offers a four-year degree concentration within the B.F.A. specifically designed for Richmond Ballet trainees. This unique program bridges trainee experience with the Richmond Ballet professional company and rigorous pre-professional training with a focus in modern/contemporary dance. During the first two years, students receive VCU credit for their work at the Richmond Ballet while taking general education courses, dance history and improvisation at VCU. Students then complete the degree with two years at VCU, taking courses in modern/contemporary dance, ballet, composition, dance science, teaching methods and more. There are many opportunities to perform throughout the four years. This B.F.A. program is designed for disciplined students who are interested in attaining versatility in both ballet and modern/contemporary dance while exploring creative, historical and global perspectives of the field. A very small number of students in this degree program are offered the opportunity to join Richmond Ballet II after their first two years. Students are encouraged to discuss professional and academic plans with their advisers should this occur. Student learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Students must demonstrate proficiency in improvisation, composition, choreography and related art forms that encourage creativity and an individual point of view. Students must demonstrate proficiency in modern dance and a diverse range of other dance techniques. The objective is to maximize students’ potential to become versatile dancers of technical excellence. Students must demonstrate a global and historical perspective of dance as an art form with an emphasis on contemporary approaches to dance making and performance. Students must demonstrate writing and critical-thinking skills. Students must demonstrate comprehensive and theoretical understanding of the field.

Theatre, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in performance

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/theatre/theatre-bfa-concentration-performance/

The Department of Theatre offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts that may be entered into during the third year. All freshman and transfer students entering the department are initially classified as Theatre Foundation students. After successfully completing the first two years of core theatre courses in their foundation areas of emphasis, students apply for admission to a specific degree program (B.F.A. or B.A.). In the B.F.A students concentrate on areas in performance, including musical theatre, and stage management, as well as three areas of design/technology: scenic, lighting and costume. (See the individual concentration pages for curricular outlines.) Student participation in both credit- and noncredit-bearing department activities may be required. Students matriculating in School of the Arts degree programs are bound by the policies and procedures stipulated in this bulletin and in any other current handbook or policy document adopted by the individual programs. Because of the environment that exists in these preprofessional programs, all aspects of theatre as art, craft, business and education are experienced together. The curriculum immerses students in the practicalities of theatre. Throughout the four years, the performer works daily with voice, body and imagination, while the designer/technician is involved in studio classes and practical application. Student learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Demonstrate skills and techniques needed to enter the profession as an actor Demonstrate knowledge of history, theory and literature and their practical application

Foreign Language, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in French

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/school-worldstudies/foreign-language-ba-concentration-french/

In today’s world, language learning is more important than ever. The ability to navigate across diverse language, ethnic, racial and cultural​ ​borders allows connection with others, helping create a more inclusive and mutually respectful society. Additionally, employers the world over value the communication skills, cultural competence and practical experiences language students acquire through course work, internships, service learning and study abroad. Proficiency in a second language offers special practical benefits: VCU graduates with language skills are among the more qualified candidates for jobs in international businesses, nonprofits and government agencies. They also qualify for jobs as language teachers in schools, where they often serve as role models, mentors and leaders.

Foreign Language, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in German

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/school-worldstudies/foreign-language-ba-concentration-german/

In today’s world, language learning is more important than ever. The ability to navigate across diverse language, ethnic, racial and cultural​ ​borders allows connection with others, helping create a more inclusive and mutually respectful society. Additionally, employers the world over value the communication skills, cultural competence and practical experiences language students acquire through course work, internships, service learning and study abroad. Proficiency in a second language offers special practical benefits: VCU graduates with language skills are among the more qualified candidates for jobs in international businesses, nonprofits and government agencies. They also qualify for jobs as language teachers in schools, where they often serve as role models, mentors and leaders.

Foreign Language, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in Spanish

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/school-worldstudies/foreign-language-ba-concentration-spanish/

In today’s world, language learning is more important than ever. The ability to navigate across diverse language, ethnic, racial and cultural​ ​borders allows connection with others, helping create a more inclusive and mutually respectful society. Additionally, employers the world over value the communication skills, cultural competence and practical experiences language students acquire through course work, internships, service learning and study abroad. Proficiency in a second language offers special practical benefits: VCU graduates with language skills are among the more qualified candidates for jobs in international businesses, nonprofits and government agencies. They also qualify for jobs as language teachers in schools, where they often serve as role models, mentors and leaders.

Fashion, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in fashion design

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/fashion-design-merchandising/fashion-bfa-concentration-fashion-design/

The fashion design curriculum offers technical and design courses that provide skills required in the fashion industry. Individual designs are presented in two-dimensional form, developed and perfected through techniques used in the fashion industry, and then executed in final and three-dimensional form in fabrics appropriate to the design. Junior design students are encouraged to complete internships in the fashion industry in New York City. Internships provide not only experience but industry contacts, and are strongly recommended. They may be conducted primarily during the summer semester. Study abroad programs are readily available for fashion design majors. Student learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Utilize problem-solving skills: Apply investigative and research skills in the completion of studio projects Implement industry-standard computer technology Demonstrate professional visual and oral presentation skills Understand the global nature of the fashion industry

Art History, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/art-history/art-history-ba/

The B.A. in Art History is a liberal arts program composed of an academic course of study exposing the student to the scholarship, theoretical perspectives and research methods of not only the history of art, but related disciplines in the humanities. Courses focus on cultures, historical periods and regions. The program also includes possibilities for directed research projects as well as museum internships. This curriculum provides students the best possible background for future graduate work in art history.

Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/gender-sexuality-womens-studies/gender-sexuality-womens-studies-ba/

Students will demonstrate strong critical thinking skills that connect theory to action. Students will employ multiple theories informed by intersectionality. Students will demonstrate critical engagement with multiple epistemologies and methods of research. Students will articulate the ways diverse feminisms converge and diverge in the 21st century. Students will articulate contexts for intellectual, academic and artistic activism.

International Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in European studies

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/school-worldstudies/international-studies-ba-concentration-european-studies/

The international studies program offers a varied interdisciplinary humanities curriculum, global in scope and designed to increase students’ knowledge about the cultures and traditions, languages, literature and media, history, values, concerns, and aspirations of peoples in different countries and regions of the world. The goal of the program is ultimately also to both broaden students’ comparative intercultural perspectives and develop their cross-cultural communication abilities. Within each chosen concentration, the interdisciplinary range of offerings allows for flexibility in configuring each individual’s course of study, which can be organized in a manner that best suits a student’s particular needs.

African American Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/african-american-studies/african-american-studies-ba/

The Bachelor of Arts in African American Studies is an interdisciplinary degree that provides students with knowledge of human cultures and intellectual and practical skills to engage complexity, diversity and change. The degree program fosters students’ personal and social responsibility and, through applied learning experiences, empowers students to negotiate and to solve the complex problems of the 21st century. African American studies majors often pursue graduate and professional degree programs in business, education, history, international relations, law, political science, psychology, public health and social work. Career opportunities with a B.A. only in African American Studies include employment in community health agencies, public and private schools and nonprofit organizations.

Economics, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) [School of Business]

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/business/economics/economics-bs/

...unique blend of liberal arts and business. Therefore...an elective if SCMA 302 is taken as...

Biology, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/biology/biology-bs/

...Evolution 3 CHEM 302 & CHEZ 302 Organic Chemistry...the School of the Arts The minimum number...

Computer Science, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/engineering/computer-science/computer-science-bs/

...provides state-of-the-art education through the...256 , CMSC 257 , CMSC 302 , CMSC 303 and...

ARTE 302. Art for Elementary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture, 1 seminar and 2 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of ARTE 301 to enroll in ARTE 302. The nature of art and its function in the lives of individuals and society is considered in addition to materials and methods for guiding the visual expression of children.

GDES 302. Book Arts. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. An introduction to the tools, materials and craft of contemporary bookmaking. Investigation of bookbinding, handcraft and related techniques.