Document Type

Book Chapter

Original Publication Date

2013

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Republicans and Race: The GOP’s Frayed Relationship with African Americans, 1945–1974

First Page

1

Last Page

33

Comments

From Republicans and Race: The GOP’s Frayed Relationship with African Americans, 1945–1974 by Timothy N. Thurber. Used by permission of and available for purchase at University Press of Kansas.

Date of Submission

July 2014

Abstract

Introduction and chapter one from the book, Republicans and Race: The GOP’s Frayed Relationship with African Americans, 1945–1974.

From the author's introduction "I offer a fresh look at the relationship between African Americans and the GOP. This book explores how Republicans at the federal level approached racial policy and politics between 1945 and 1974. Though the struggle for black equality existed before then and continues today, these three decades constitute a distinct era in that battle. African Americans and their allies grew more assertive in challenging the status quo. Some focused on direct action protests, while others primarily lobbied the federal government. Civil rights reformers demanded changes in economics, segregation, voting, housing, and other matters. Their struggle encompassed the entire nation, not just the South. The most prominent and influential reformers focused on removing racial distinctions from the law-they fought for a "color-blind" society."

Rights

Copyright © 2013 by the University Press of Kansas

Recommended Citation

Thurber, Timothy N. "Fair Employment, Voting Rights, and Racial Violence (including Introduction)" In Republicans and race: the GOP's frayed relationship with African Americans, 1945-1974. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2013, Available from VCU Scholars Compass, http://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/hist_pubs/8.

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