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Segregation. Color Pattern from the Past–Our Struggle to Wipe it Out. Survey Graphic, January 1947

  This item may also be read through the Internet Archive.         Materials related to this topic may also be found in the Social Welfare History Image Portal.        Continue Reading »

Music & Social Reform

Written by Catherine A. Paul. “Throughout the history of the United States, music has been used to bring people together. By singing together, people are able to form emotional bonds and even shape behavior…Therefore, it is unsurprising that social movements have similarly interwoven music and action to create and sustain commitment to causes and collective activities.”Continue Reading »

Disability Rights & Universal Design

Disability rights originated in Boston, Massachusetts in 1846 with Samuel Gridley Howe. Howe was an advocate for education of the blind, and a supporter of the “feeble-minded.” Continue Reading »

The March (1963) Film

The March (1963) Film Directed by James Blue. Introduction by Carl Rowan. Courtesy of the National Archives (National Archives Identifier 47526)   Note: The audio from 23:13 to 29:44 in this film has been redacted due to a copyright restriction by Dr. King’s family. In 2008, The Motion Picture Preservation Lab completed a full digital restoration of James… Continue Reading »

Shuttlesworth, Rev. Fred

As Birmingham goes, so goes the nation. That belief was the driving force behind Shuttlesworth’s crusade for equality. “He was the soul and heart of the Birmingham movement,” Georgia Rep. John Lewis said. It was Birmingham, he said, that brought the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

“Fred Shuttlesworth had the vision, the determination never to give up, never to give in,” Lewis said. “He led an unbelievable children’s crusade. It was the children who faced dogs, fire hoses, police billy clubs that moved and shook the nation.”Continue Reading »

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

SCLC is a now a nation wide organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries.Continue Reading »

The Women Who Went to the Field – A Poem

The Women Who Went to the Field   Editor’s Note: Clara Barton (founder of the American Red Cross) wrote the following poem as a toast to women who served in the Civil War. It was first presented at a gala dinner held in 1892 by the Women’s Relief Corps and was later printed in many… Continue Reading »

Villard, Oswald Garrison

Oswald Garrison Villard (1872 – 1942): Civil Rights Activist and Editor of the The Nation and the New York Evening Post   Oswald Garrison Villard (1872–1949) was an American journalist, pacifist, and civil rights advocate.  The son of railroad tycoon Henry Villard and and suffragist Fanny Villard (the daughter of abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison) and… Continue Reading »

Oswald Villard, the NAACP and The Nation Journal

In 1909, when the founders of the NAACP needed help organizing their new civil rights group, they reached out to Oswald Garrison Villard, The Nation’s future editor and owner.Continue Reading »

Principles of The Universal Negro Improvement Association (Marcus Garvey, 1922)

We of the Universal Negro Improvement Association are determined to unite the 400,000,000 Negroes of the world to give expression to their own feeling; we are determined to unite the 400,000,000 Negroes of the world for the purpose of building a civilization of their own. And in that effort we desire to bring together the 15,000,000 of the United States, the 180,000,000 in Asia, the West Indies and Central and South America, and the 200,000,000 in Africa. We are looking toward political freedom on the continent of Africa, the land of our fathers.Continue Reading »

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