COVID-19: For information related to COVID-19 (formerly referred to as “novel coronavirus"), visit massey.vcu.edu/covid-19

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Menu

How is non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma diagnosed?

In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination, diagnostic procedures for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma may include the following:

  • Additional blood tests and other evaluation procedures.
  • X-rays of the chest, bones, liver and spleen – a diagnostic test which uses invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of internal tissues, bones and organs onto film. 
  • Lymph node biopsy – a procedure performed to remove tissue or cells from the body for examination under a microscope. 
  • Bone marrow aspiration and/or biopsy – a procedure that involves taking a small amount of bone marrow fluid (aspiration) and/or solid bone marrow tissue (called a core biopsy), usually from the hip bones, to be examined for the number, size and maturity of blood cells and/or abnormal cells. 
  • Computed tomography scan (also called a CT or CAT scan) – a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general X-rays. 
  • Ultrasound (also called sonography) – a diagnostic imaging technique which uses high-frequency sound waves and a computer to create images of blood vessels, tissues and organs. Ultrasounds are used to view internal organs as they function and to assess blood flow through various vessels.
View graphic version